Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Texas Tea Party Chief: GOP Doesn't Want Black People Voting

Ken Emanuelson's Facebook profile pic. Emanuelson is not actually such a big fan of "We the People"—or that is, his conception of them seems exclusive. Today Emanuelson was complaining about a liberal Twitter poster he did not like being "bulletproof". 
Texas Tea Party chief, Ken Emanuelson, once criticized Governor Rick Perry for being "tone-deaf", when Perry was talking about "states' rights" in reference to fighting big government. Emanuelson meant that there was a racist, historical context for the use of the term, which Perry was ignoring.

So, it is ironic that Emanuelson, who is involved with the Grassroots Texans Tea Party Network, has now ignored his own advice and gotten himself and the Texas GOP, deep into tone-deaf land. The good news for Emanuelson is that at least he told the truth. But, in doing so, he confessed something the GOP has been trying, desperately to deny.

What's that truth?

At a May 20th "get out the vote" meeting of Dallas Republicans, Emanuelson was asked by a black Republican, Bishop John Lawson, about what the GOP was doing to "get black people to vote".

Emanuelson answered:

"Well, I’m gonna be real honest with you. Uhm. The Republican Party doesn’t want black people to vote, if they’re gonna vote 9-1 for Democrats."

This statement has been much quoted in the past 24 hours, after Battlegound Texas, a new political action group devoted to turning Texas "blue", provided an audio snippet with Emanuelson's stark admission. Because Battleground Texas quoted the statement on their site leaving out the "if they're gonna vote 9-1 for Democrats", some Republicans, and Emanuelson himself, have complained his comments were taken out of context.

But, in attempting yesterday to clarify his statement, on Facebook, Emanuelson did not reject the idea that the GOP should not seek to register black voters, but he claimed to have "mispoken" insofar as he gave the impression that his opinion about this was also the GOP's policy.

All of this is a strange and confusing in light of other things Emanuelson claimed to care about—for example that he thought it would be a good idea if the GOP developed some kind of more effective outreach to black voters in Texas.

Why bother doing that, if at the same time Emanuelson thinks it isn't in the "interest" of the GOP to have black voters voting?

And the key point about Emanuelson's admission of course is that it is absolutely in concert with the actions by Texas and other GOP-run states to suppress minority voting.

Emanuelson is simply stating the facts: the GOP counts black voters as enemies, and so has attempted to disenfranchise them—which makes the GOP not merely racist but a threat to the electoral process in the USA.

At the May 20th meeting, Emanuelson followed up his admission by saying he thought it was bad that the GOP had ignored black Texans, and that something should be done.

Repeatedly one can hear on the recording the voice of Bishop Lawson asking "Doing what?!" to Emanuelson's vague suggestion that maybe, sometime off in the future, the Texas GOP might start taking some real action to connect with black Texans. In an incomplete transcript of the exchange, Emanuelson's Tea Party group shows Lawson saying "Doing what?" only once, but he said it three times at least.

Eventually, the Republican leaders at the conference explain to Lawson that they just don't have the time to discuss what they might do—after all they're trying to run a get out the [white] vote campaign. And black people aren't really part of the Tea Party demographic.

As some people have pointed out to Emanuelson, given the enormous amount of bad press he's generating for himself, and mainly for the GOP, he might as well be working for the Texas Democratic Party.

But, so far anyway, Emanuelson is still peddling conservatism for the Texas Tea Party, and tossing truth-turds at the Texas GOP.

No comments:

Post a Comment